Serbia’s capital is becoming increasingly popular among travelers, and with good reason. Belgrade is only 4 hours away with the best fares from Skopje Taxi. From the ancient fortresses, remarkable history and rich culture, to the tasty cuisine and dynamic nightlife, in this post we’ll be talking about some of the places you should visit during your stay in Belgrade.

Kalemegdan

One of the first places you should visit in Belgrade is Kalemegdan. Kalemegdan is the crown jewel of Belgrade. It’s a fortress and a beautiful green area with an impressive view over New Belgrade and the Sava and Danube confluence. Being in the center of many turbulent events, Kalemegdan was damaged and rebuilt many times. That’s one of the reasons why it carries a unique mix of western and oriental influences. Across Kalemegdan you can find museums, galleries, restaurants, sport courts and the Belgrade Zoo. Kalemegdan is the largest attraction of the city, free of charge with its gates open to the public 24/ 7, all year round. It is in the heart of Belgrade and is adjacent to the city boroughs of Stari Grad, Dorcol and Savamala.

The view from Kalemegdan fortress

Knez Mihailova

Knez Mihailova is Belgrade’s longest pedestrian street, the social midpoint for people and the main shopping area. Numerous shops, restaurants and bookstores are inside classy 19th-century buildings with delicate facades. Street painters and musicians make sure the street stays one of the most vibrant and interesting ones in the city. It’s the favorite district for most locals lying between Terazije Square and the Kalemegdan Fortress. Knez Mihailova is within easy reach from almost every part of the city. As the cultural, architectural and historical hub, Knez Mihailova is one of the most beautiful pedestrian streets in Eastern Europe.

Knez Mihailova street

Skadarlija

Another street on the list of places to visit in Belgrade is Skadarlija. Skadarlija is a lively cobblestone street at the heart of Belgrade, with a true bohemian atmosphere. It has lots of history paved deep in its pebbles beneath pedestrian’s feet. Over a hundred years ago there were lots of small craft shops lined along the street. Later, these shops turned into kafanas, the Balkan version of a tavern. Throughout the years, Skadarlija became a major tourist attraction. It’s often referred to as “the Montmartre of Belgrade” since in the past it was a popular focal point of Serbian and Yugoslav artists, writers and poets. Genuine traditional restaurants take pride in their guest lists of worldwide celebrities who have been their guests for decades now.

Kafana on Skadarlija street

Zemun

Zemun is a small town within Belgrade, officially part of Serbia after the end of World War I. Before the war, it was the southernmost town of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. With its narrow streets and well preserved architecture, Zemun is a treat to discover on foot. The GardoŇ° tower or Millennium tower is a try symbol of Zemun. It was built in 1896 on the ruins of a medieval fortress and offers an amazing view of the city. Zemun Kej is one of the most engrossing walkways. Alongside river Danube, you can find lots of nice restaurants to enjoy food at and the fresh river breeze.

Zemun

Church of Saint Sava

The Church of Saint Sava is the world’s second largest Orthodox Church. It carries its name after Sava, a Serbian monk from the 13th century, the founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church and its first archbishop. The church was built on the spot where the Ottomans burned Saint Sava’s remains in 1595, but nearly 400 years passed before the church itself was completed. Today, the exterior of the church has beautiful white marble and is finished. But the insides are still under construction due to the delicate frescos and the size of the church. Church of Saint Sava dominates the city’s skyline, standing tall at 79 meters. It’s visible from almost every part of Belgrade and it carries the intriguing story about the struggle of Serbian people throughout the centuries.

Church of Saint Sava

Republic Square

Belgrade’s Republic Square is the main meeting point where social evenings begin by the horse. The statue is of Prince Mihajlo riding on horseback. This square got its name Republic Square as it represents the very heart of the city. It’s also a historical spot where many protests and riots have happened, among other things. Some of Belgrade’s most important buildings are here, including the National Museum and the National Theater. The museum has been closed for over 15 years now, but the theater is open.

The statue of Prince Mihajlo on Republic Square

Museum of Yugoslavia

If you want a glimpse into the fascinating history of Yugoslavia, the Museum of Yugoslavia is a must-see. There is an extraordinary collection of artefacts, historical documents, photographs, weapons and films from the communist period. Besides the museum, you can visit the House of Flowers where you’ll find the resting place of the Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito and his wife, Jovanka.

Museum of Yugoslavia

Nikola Tesla Museum

Another museum on the list of places to visit in Belgrade is the Nikola Tesla Museum. One of the people Serbs are most proud of, is Nikola Tesla – the brilliant Serbian-American inventor, engineer and futurist, most famous for developing modern alternating current electricity system. The Nikola Tesla Museum contains all sorts of documents, books, drawings and photographs related to Tesla’s work. You can also find interesting interactive exhibitions displaying some of Tesla’s inventions. Inside you’ll also see a strange, golden orb. That’s an urn containing Nikola Tesla’s ashes.

Nikola Tesla Museum

Ada Ciganlija

Ada Ciganlija, a river island turned peninsula, is affectionately known as “Belgrade’s Seaside”. Only 15 mins away by bus from the city center, awaits a green, peaceful oasis surrounded by a lake, long beaches, picnic tables and more. Ada also offers bungee jumping, water ski cableway, a rock climbing wall, a water slide for kids, rugby, baseball and tennis courts, beach volleyball courts, a golf course, you name it. The impressive Ada Bridge which connects the city to the peninsula, quickly became one of the symbols of Belgrade.

Ada Ciganlija

Avala Tower

Last but not least, one of the places to visit in Belgrade, if you have the time, is the Avala Tower. The Avala Tower is a telecommunication tower located at mount Avala at the outskirts of Belgrade. It’s 205 meters high and presently the tallest tower on the Balkans. On a clear, sunny day you can have a great view of 100 kilometers around onto the surrounding villages, hills, distant New Belgrade blocks and even Vojvodina region, a plain in the north of Belgrade. The tower was build in 1965 and destroyed during the NATO bombing in 1999. It was reconstructed and re-opened in 2010. Mount Avala is full of forests and makes a really nice destination for a picnic.

Avala Tower

Hope you enjoy our list of 10 places to visit in Belgrade and we wish you a pleasant stay!